‘Bypass Blocks’ requires you to provide a way for users to skip repeated blocks of content.

Introduction

Websites often have the same, or very similar, content at the top of each page (for example the navigation menu, header and certain graphics). Some users with visual, motor or cognitive impairments who navigate sequentially through elements can struggle to get past this repetitive content.

For example:

  • screen readers often announce all of the elements on the page to the user in order;
  • users who navigate by keyboard might have to key past each link in a menu; and
  • users who browse with a lot of zoom can get lost on a page.

To help these users navigate your website, provide a way for them to bypass the repetitive parts of each page.

How to Pass ‘Bypass Blocks’

  • Add a visible ‘Skip to Content’ link to all pages on your website that sends users to the start of the main content on each page; or
  • Add a link at the start of any repeated content to skip it; or
  • Add links at the start of a page to each area of content.

‘Bypass Blocks’ Tips

While a ‘Skip to Content’ link will pass this guideline, there is a little more you can do. A standard in HTML5 allows you to label your navigation menu as a <nav> element. Some screen readers can use the <nav> element and provide a way for users to skip menus. 

See Also

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About Author

I'm Luke, I started Wuhcag in 2012 to help people like you get to grips with web accessibility. Check out my book, 'How to Meet the WCAG 2.0'.