The purpose of all components must be clear and machine-readable.

Introduction

Users often set personal preferences in their browser or assistive technology to help them understand websites. By ensuring components are understandable by these technologies, users can experience websites in the way that best suits their needs.

Users with cognitive impairments (such as problems with memory, focus, language and decision-making) benefit from this approach. For example, they may set their browser to display a familiar icon for a navigation link or replace your chosen icon for one component with an icon they understand.

How to Pass

  • Use ARIA landmarks to define regions of each page
  • Use HTML markup to identify links, icons and user interface components

See Also

Understanding Success Criterion 1.3.6 (W3C)

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About Author

I'm Luke, I started Wuhcag in 2012 to help people like you get to grips with web accessibility. Check out my book, 'How to Meet the WCAG 2.0'.